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reblogged from crislemon

crislemon:

Martian north pole

crislemon:

Martian north pole

reblogged from making--memories

making—memories:

Curitiba - Paraná

making—memories:

Curitiba - Paraná

reblogged from mylittlefun

mylittlefun:

Snow in New England by NASA Goddard Photo and Video on Flickr.

mylittlefun:

Snow in New England by NASA Goddard Photo and Video on Flickr.

reblogged from fiach-dubh

fiach-dubh:

fiach-dubh:

reblogged from blagopoluchniy

reblogged from tapejarascience

HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY FROM SPACE

tapejarascience:

 Clusters, Hartley, and the Heart   Credit & Copyright:  Rogelio Bernal Andreo
 Explanation:  An alluring Comet Hartley 2 cruised through planet Earth’s night sky on October 8, passing within about a Full Moon’s width of the famous double star cluster in Perseus. The much anticipated celestial photo-op was recorded here in a 3 frame mosaic with greenish comet and the clusters h and Chi Persei placed at the left. The well-chosen, wide field of view spans about 7 degrees. It extends across the constellation boundary into Cassiopeia, all the way to the Heart Nebula (IC 1805) at the far right. To capture the cosmic moment, a relatively short 5 minute exposure was used to freeze the moving comet in place, but a longer exposure with a narrow-band filter was included in the central and right hand frames. The narrow-band exposure brings out the fainter reddish glow of the nebula’s atomic hydrogen gas, in contrast to the cometary coma’s kryptonite green. In the past few days, comet watchers have reported that Hartley 2 has become just visible to the unaided eye for experienced observers from dark, clear sites. On October 20, the comet will make its closest approach to Earth, passing within about 17 million kilometers. On November 4, a NASA spacecraft will fly by the comet’s small nucleus estimated to be only 1.5 kilometers in diameter.

HAPPY VALENTINE’S DAY FROM SPACE

tapejarascience:

Clusters, Hartley, and the Heart
Credit & Copyright: Rogelio Bernal Andreo

Explanation: An alluring Comet Hartley 2 cruised through planet Earth’s night sky on October 8, passing within about a Full Moon’s width of the famous double star cluster in Perseus. The much anticipated celestial photo-op was recorded here in a 3 frame mosaic with greenish comet and the clusters h and Chi Persei placed at the left. The well-chosen, wide field of view spans about 7 degrees. It extends across the constellation boundary into Cassiopeia, all the way to the Heart Nebula (IC 1805) at the far right. To capture the cosmic moment, a relatively short 5 minute exposure was used to freeze the moving comet in place, but a longer exposure with a narrow-band filter was included in the central and right hand frames. The narrow-band exposure brings out the fainter reddish glow of the nebula’s atomic hydrogen gas, in contrast to the cometary coma’s kryptonite green. In the past few days, comet watchers have reported that Hartley 2 has become just visible to the unaided eye for experienced observers from dark, clear sites. On October 20, the comet will make its closest approach to Earth, passing within about 17 million kilometers. On November 4, a NASA spacecraft will fly by the comet’s small nucleus estimated to be only 1.5 kilometers in diameter.

reblogged from acewings

acewings:

#Comet #ISON tracked and shot by Nasa’s Deep Impact Probe. Full majesty in November 2013 for us!

ALL about Comet C/2012 S1 ISON: The comet will pass approximately 1,100,000 kilometres (680,000 miles) above the Sun’s surface.

It will pass about 0.42 AU (63,000,000 km; 39,000,000 miles) from Earth on 26 December 2013.

Earth is expected to pass through the orbit of the comet on 14–15 January 2014, which may result in the creation of a meteor shower.

Around the time the comet reaches its perihelion on 28 November, it may become extremely bright if it remains intact, probably reaching a negative magnitude. It may briefly become brighter than the full Moon.

The name of the comet is simply, C/2012 S1. The addition of “(ISON)” after its name, merely identifies the organization where its discovery was made, the Russia-based International Scientific Optical Network.

(excerpts from Wikipedia)

reblogged from omarvargass

omarvargass:

Comet McNaught Over Chile

omarvargass:

Comet McNaught Over Chile

reblogged from nasasapod

nasasapod:

Comet Lemmon near the South Celestial Pole Image Credit & Copyright: Peter Ward (Barden Ridge Observatory)
Explanation: Currently sweeping through southern skies, Comet Lemmon (C/2012 F6) was named for its discovery last year as part of the Mount Lemmon (Arizona) Survey.Brighter than expected but still just below naked-eye visibility, Comet Lemmon sports a stunning lime green coma and faint divided tail in this telescopic image from February 4. The greenish tint comes from the coma’s diatomic C2 gas fluorescing in sunlight. Captured from an observatory near Sydney, Australia, the color composite is constructed from a series of individual exposures registered on the comet. Across the 1 degree wide field of view, the star trails are a consequence of the comet’s relatively rapid motion against the background of stars near the South Celestial Pole. Moving north, the comet should grower brighter, reaching a peak (3rd magnitude or so) when it is closest to the Sun in late March. By early April it should be visible from the northern hemisphere. Of course, this year Comet Lemmon may be just another pretty comet as skygazers on planet Earth also eagerly anticipate views of Comet PANSTARRS and Comet ISON.

nasasapod:

Comet Lemmon near the South Celestial Pole 
Image Credit & CopyrightPeter Ward (Barden Ridge Observatory)

Explanation: Currently sweeping through southern skies, Comet Lemmon (C/2012 F6) was named for its discovery last year as part of the Mount Lemmon (Arizona) Survey.Brighter than expected but still just below naked-eye visibility, Comet Lemmon sports a stunning lime green coma and faint divided tail in this telescopic image from February 4. The greenish tint comes from the coma’s diatomic C2 gas fluorescing in sunlight. Captured from an observatory near Sydney, Australia, the color composite is constructed from a series of individual exposures registered on the comet. Across the 1 degree wide field of view, the star trails are a consequence of the comet’s relatively rapid motion against the background of stars near the South Celestial Pole. Moving north, the comet should grower brighter, reaching a peak (3rd magnitude or so) when it is closest to the Sun in late March. By early April it should be visible from the northern hemisphere. Of course, this year Comet Lemmon may be just another pretty comet as skygazers on planet Earth also eagerly anticipate views of Comet PANSTARRS and Comet ISON.

reblogged from thenewenlightenmentage

thenewenlightenmentage:


Halley’s Comet in 1986

thenewenlightenmentage:

Halley’s Comet in 1986